Taboos make it hard to discuss mortality in China

WHEN Li Songtang was 17, officials overseeing Mao’s chaotic Cultural Revolution sent him from Beijing to Inner Mongolia, a northern province where he became a “barefoot doctor”—a medical worker with rudimentary training. His patients included an academic whom the government had expelled in disgrace from the capital, and who had become terminally ill. The patient grew sicker and increasingly troubled by his political black mark. Unable to console him, Mr Li eventually lied that he had persuaded authorities to wipe the slate clean. The patient grabbed his arm with relief and gratitude, recalls Mr Li. “I can still feel it today.”

Mr Li’s experience of caring for the dying man eventually resulted in the hospice he runs in a three-storey building in Beijing’s outskirts. The facility is home to about 300 people, most of them elderly and with late-stage cancer (a patient there is pictured with a nurse). On a weekend the bright corridors are busy with volunteers who have come to chat with…Continue reading


Go to Source

Free Book: Doing Business in China - Tips and Tracks

China has its own business culture and etiquette.
There are many things that a businessman from West needs to understand if he wants to enter the China market and succeed.

Check Email To Downoad the book

Something went wrong.

You might also like More from author

Comments

Loading...
Hide me
Free Giveaway Book: Doing Business in China – Tips and Tracks
Subscribe to download - Doing Business in China – Tips and Tracks
Show me
Build an optin email list in WordPress [Free Software]

Send this to friend